The responsibility behind the words “trust me”

the-beatles

One of my admirers once told me “please don’t fuck up my life.”

The request took me aback, but I smiled with the realization of where we stood in relation to each other. He was younger that I but not more confused than I had been at his age. He looked to me to give order to his life and to put him down a path of confidence, and it was my responsibility to change his perspective to teach him to look into himself to answer questions of uncertainty.

Without a smile I gripped his shoulder, leaned forward and looked deep into his eyes telling him “Trust me. I’m not going to fuck up your life. In fact, if you’re open to it this could be the best thing that ever happened to you.”

With that touch, the eye contact, and those words, his face softened just a bit. There was still fear in his eyes by which the elimination of was our unspoken agreement.

And with that he began to tell me that he keep a very high standard of himself. I told him to start keeping a higher standard of himself.

Any degression into fear or uncertainty is a mistake and it is the responsibility of the mentor to cut these thing out at the root. To foresee them before they manifest in any way. Trust is confidence. If you trick people into believing in a false sense of confidence you are leading them off a cliff and fuck you.

Much love.

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Reconnecting with nature

I have wondered why people find it so interesting to go to scenic places in nature. The connection to the earth doesn’t seem to get to me in the way that others have explained it and the prestige that comes with the pictures doesn’t make sense in and of itself. The only way to give meaning to finding scenic views is the exercise to get there and the possibly the people that join you on the journey. The group can have a quasi meaningful mission that can work as a bonding experience and productive and this gives meaning over something that is meaningless in and of itself. 

Perhaps people, and a deep level understand that these places will not be around for much longer. What we are actually doing is saying our last words to a dying friend and that this is what it really means to connect with nature. To stand in realization to the impermanence of beauty and almost mournfully watch the moments destroy themselves for the creating of the new. 

The past is beautiful and it is something to be missed. No one knows what the future will bring but we can say that it will look different than now. For better or worse it doesn’t really matter. All we are is a striving for a more complete perspective.